eFront in Top 100 Tools for Learning 2013

Thank you to all our clients and users who voted for us!

The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2013 list (released 30 September 2013) was compiled from the votes of over 500 education and workplace learning professionals from 48 countries. For a fuller analysis, please visit Analysis 2013.

In this year’s list, Twitter retains its no 1 position – now for the 5th year running – then comes Google Drive/Docs at #2. PowerPoint moved up to #5 and Evernote moved into the top 10 at #6. Google + and Hangouts moved into the top 10 at #10 and eFront moved up 19 places to #67.  You can view a text list of the 100 Tools here along with the Slideshare presentation.

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10 eLearning buzzwords you need to know!

top-10In this post we’ve put together short descriptions of the top 10 buzzwords in eLearning at the moment: Tin Can, Social Learning, Gamification, mLearning, Tablet learning, Rapid eLearning, Microlearning, Personalization, Blended learning, and Lifelong learning.

Tin Can

The Tin Can API is a brand new learning technology specification that opens up an entire world of experiences (online and offline). This API captures the activities that happen as part of learning experiences. A wide range of systems can now securely communicate with a simple vocabulary that captures this stream of activities. Previous specifications were difficult and had limitations whereas the Tin Can API is simple and flexible, and lifts many of the older restrictions. Mobile learning, simulations, virtual worlds, serious games, real-world activities, experiential learning, social learning, offline learning, and collaborative learning are just some of the things that can now be recognized and communicated well with the Tin Can API. What’s more, the Tin Can API is community-driven, and free to implement.  (TinCanAPI.com)

For more on Tin Can check our previous posts listed on this page.

Social Learning

Social learning is learning that takes place through social interaction between peers and it may or may not lead to a change in attitudes and/or behavior. More specifically, to be considered social learning, a process must: (1) demonstrate that a change in understanding has taken place in the individuals involved; (2) demonstrate that this change goes beyond the individual and becomes situated within wider social units or communities of practice; and (3) occur through social interactions and processes between actors within a social network (Reed et al., 2010).

For more on Social Learning check our previous posts on-topic listed on this page.

Gamification

Karl Kapp, author of The Gamification of Learning and Instruction: Game-Based Methods and Strategies for Training and Education, defines it as the use of game-based mechanics, aesthetics and game thinking to engage people, motivate action, promote learning and solve problems. He says it’s much more than just adding ‘rewards, points, and badges’ to processes to motivate people – it’s the instructional method and not just the delivery system that provides the elements for learning in a game situation i.e. we must ask what ‘pieces’ in games makes them engaging such as interactivity, content, story.

Gamification for Learning – Interview with Karl Kapp http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__Y1m8XF77k Continue reading

efront LMS integration with Facebook

Lately we’ve been talking a lot about using Facebook as a learning platform. Social is integral to learning in the workforce today – and learning platforms need to be able to support formal and informal, personalized and social learning. We took that into consideration with the eFront platform which comes with a rich set of social tools that facilitate the communication and social learning process together with an easy-to-use Facebook integration plugin.

Facebook Integration

eFront allows users to connect to the platform via their Facebook account. By using the Facebook connection some info from Facebook is transferred to efront (specifically the user status and avatar). If the eFront user changes his/her status this change is also reflected on his/her Facebook profile.

The administrator enables the Facebook integration though the system settings and the Facebook tab (in ‘External tools’) by entering the Facebook API key and secret code. The admin can then choose to allow connection with Facebook, Facebook data acquisition (avatar and status exchanges) and the external login to eFront through a Facebook account.

The basic steps to create the FB integration are outlined below, or you can go directly to our wiki page for more on social extensions.

1. Go to http://developers.facebook.com/ and click on “Create new App”

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Continue reading

Competition Finalist 3: Social Learning Applied

This post was submitted by Kalliopi Sigala.

Social Learning. Buzz word, right? Well, yes and no. The truth is somewhere in the middle. To get down to it, let’s see some actual facts and concepts that can be useful in the real world, and not just for the hype of it.

First, a quick recap. Social Learning is one of the four trending topics in the e-Learning industry right now (others being Mobile, Gamification and Bit-Size eLearning). Sure, these are buzzwords also, but the truth is that these three are easily digestible when it comes to thinking applications to learning processes and e-learning technologies. Social Learning is vague. Roberta Gogos previously posted a great definition of what social learning is, but where do we go from here? How can we use Social Learning concepts to leverage the learning process and improve the average learning curve? Continue reading

What is social learning?

‘Social learning’ has been the elearning buzzword du jour for a couple of years now and people often ask us exactly what social learning is. I think Marcia Conner captures it perfectly in her definition as follows:

Social learning is learning that takes place through social interaction between peers and it may or may not lead to a change in attitudes and/or behavior. More specifically, to be considered social learning, a process must: (1) demonstrate that a change in understanding has taken place in the individuals involved; (2) demonstrate that this change goes beyond the individual and becomes situated within wider social units or communities of practice; and (3) occur through social interactions and processes between actors within a social network (Reed et al., 2010). Continue reading

The Democratic Workplace

When we hear the word “democracy” we usually think “politics.” So how is organizational politics different? Worldblu.com (a global network of organizations committed to practicing freedom and democracy in the workplace) explains the difference perfectly: “Organizational democracy is a system of organization that is based on freedom, instead of fear and control. It’s a way of designing organizations to amplify the possibilities of human potential — and the organization as a whole. The concept of democracy comes from the Greek words “demos” and “kratein” which mean “the people rule”. So the core of organizational democracy and political democracy is the same — allowing people to self-govern and determine their own destiny. What is different is the context — one is in the political arena, the other is in the realm of organizations.” Continue reading