Why SCORM 2004 failed & what that means for Tin Can

“SCORM 2004 is dying (if not already dead!).” Now that might seem like a strong statement but it’s the sad truth. For the careful observer there are many signs to support this view, and here are a few of them:

Sign #1: 75% of packages are still on SCORM 1.2, 10 years after the initial release of SCORM 2004 [1] [2]

 

Sign #2: There is no certification process for tools and packages for the latest SCORM 2004 4th edition. This is the case although several years have passed since 4th release. Currently, someone can be a 4th edition adopter but *not* certified. [3]

Sign #3: ADL itself heavily supports Tin Can as the successor of SCORM.[4]

In essence, SCORM 2004 always lived in the shadow of SCORM 1.2. Now, with the introduction of Tin Can API it seems certain that its adoption rate will decline even further.

Reasons SCORM 2004 Failed

There are a multitude of reasons why SCORM 2004 failed. Here are most prominent (and yes, we refer to SCORM 2004 in the past tense quite deliberately): Continue reading

What is Tin Can?

The Tin Can API is a brand new learning technology specification that opens up an entire world of experiences (online and offline). This API captures the activities that happen as part of learning experiences. A wide range of systems can now securely communicate with a simple vocabulary that captures this stream of activities. Previous specifications were difficult and had limitations whereas the Tin Can API is simple and flexible, and lifts many of the older restrictions. Mobile learning, simulations, virtual worlds, serious games, real-world activities, experiential learning, social learning, offline learning, and collaborative learning are just some of the things that can now be recognized and communicated well with the Tin Can API. What’s more, the Tin Can API is community-driven, and free to implement.  (TinCanAPI.com)

ADL (the keepers of SCORM) is the steward of this new specification aka “the next generation of SCORM.” Continue reading

TinCan Demystified

If you are somewhat interested in eLearning and unless you have been living on a deserted island for the last year you probably have already heard about the TinCan project. TinCan is heavily promoted as the successor of SCORM and was designed to fix many things that were lacking on the previous standard. In this post we discuss what TinCan really is and how it compares to SCORM.

The Tincan API resulted from several deliberations on SCORM 2.0 over the last five years. The standard is developed by the company RUSTICI but ADL is still the steward of the specification, just like SCORM. The Tin Can API is community-driven, and free to implement. Continue reading

ADL accepts eFront as SCORM 2004 adopter

eFront is an LMS commited to international standards. Through time we offered support for SCORM 1.2 and IMS Common Catridge and with version 3.6 we offer support for the latest iteration of SCORM 2004, its 4th edition.

Now, ADL acknowledges our support for the latest development of SCORM by approving Epignosis’s submission to become a SCORM 2004/4th edition adopter. You can check eFront’s acceptance page on ADL’s site at: http://webapps.adlnet.gov/SCORMAdopters/Adopter.aspx?i=539

The process for becoming a SCORM adopter includes submission and validation of the original, unedited Summary and Detailed Test Logs showing the Level of Conformance produced by the latest version of the Conformance Test Suite for the respective SCORM version.

Currently, eFront is one out of three systems worldwide that have achieved this level of conformance! For more info on SCORM adopters you can check the related ADL’s page located at: http://www.adlnet.gov/Technologies/scorm/Custom%20Pages/SCORM%20Adopters.aspx