Do We All Learn the Same Way?

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A couple of decades ago it was inconceivable for educators to tailor their materials and teaching approach towards the individual student. The different learning styles as a concept started gaining pace ever since the term and idea behind it was first introduced in the mid 70’s.

We Learn Best in Different Ways

Today, it is only too obvious that we don’t all share the same learning mechanisms, and while it may be impractical to apply this to the everyday classroom environment, it has certainly influenced the direction, in which online learning is developing.

You don’t need to look further than yourself and your immediate circle of friends to spot the differences in your learning styles. While you may feel comfortable reading long pages of solid material, some of your friends may find it completely indigestible. While some people remember close to everything of what they hear, others’ attention wanders off as soon as they hear a narrator’s monotonous drone. While some need to isolate themselves in the deepest, darkest corner of the library or office to concentrate, others need to talk through new material with a partner or a group.
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The Art And Science Of User Feedback

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Running a business, or any other social endeavor for that matter, is all about feedback. Especially in a competitive market such as e-learning, your options are mostly limited to adapt and improve (like Apple in the 00s) or perish (like AOL in the same decade).

Now, when it comes to feedback, there are three things that matter: getting it, “getting” it, and doing something with it. Which is exactly what we’re going to cover in this post.
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Building an e-Learning Course: Content Strategies and Considerations

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There’s a saying in the real estate industry that the three most important aspects of a real estate property is “location, location, location”. In e-learning those three aspects would be “content, content, content”.

All the fancy gizmos (augmented reality, gamification, interactive multimedia and the like) won’t help you if your content is not up to the task ― the task being helping your students learn and understand the course’s subject matter, of course.

The generic advice we gave in previous posts still holds: it should be clear and succinct, well structured and divided into the appropriate lessons (or “chapters”), and accompanied with relevant as opposed to decorative examples, illustrations and media.

Beyond that, we cannot tell you in detail about how to write or structure your content because it depends on the particular course you’re offering and what better suits it.

Instead, we’ll have a look at what you should include in your course, taking into account what modern LMS platforms offer. Some of the advice (such as the need to have lessons) are seemingly obvious, but bear with us, as we delve into some issues course creators face, that you might not have thought.
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Early X-mas For eFront Users: eFrontPro Gets Its First Update

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My, how time flies. It feels like yesterday when we announced eFrontPro, the newer member of our highly successful eFront product family, designed from scratch to take advantage of the newest web technologies while maintaining the ease-of-use and flexibility that eFront is famous for (only, even more so).

eFrontPro was a major release that took some years in the making, and we would be justified to pat ourselves on the back and rest on our laurels for a while.

Instead, we worked even harder in bringing you the first update to eFrontPro, with several new features, goodies and bug fixes.

So what’s new in this update?

A lot. So much in fact, that it’s more than a point update, and almost feels like a whole 2.0 release.

When we wrote that eFrontPro will serve as a stable, modern, basis for the platform’s future, allowing us even faster development cycles we weren’t kidding.

Let’s have a rundown of the major new changes, and what they mean to eFrontPro users:

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eLearning For Sales Training

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Sales are hard. You have to know your market, and to know how to work the market. You have to know your customers, existing and potential. You have to know your leads, and how to follow up on them.

And, (this should go without saying, but you’d be surprised how often it doesn’t), you also have to know what you’re selling.

Factor in the constant changes to the market (new models, new trends, new fads, new technologies, new competitors) and the human element (talking to people and closing deals), and you’ll come to the same conclusion we began with: sales are hard.

The way we overcome the hard part in selling, is like we overcome the hard part in everything else, from learning how to program to speaking French: with training.

You have to keep your sales stuff up to date with the latest sales techniques, information about your products, the company policies and regulations, etc.

On the other hand, you also need to keep them selling, especially if you’re a smaller company that can’t afford to have employees off of work for too long, in order to attend seminars and such.

Time is money, and that’s nowhere truer than in sales.
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The Power of Simplicity

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More is better, bigger is better, shinier is better. Not necessarily when it comes to visual aesthetics in human-computer interactions.

Imagine opening a website looking for something specific, when all at once banners and pop-up ads start flashing at you, graphics are whirling, sounds exploding, text is blinking. The effect? You frantically start clicking and closing and minimizing… or you just become overwhelmed or annoyed and leave.

While not necessarily the case with training program design, there are instances when in the hopes of adding more functionality and value, course designers forget about the actual human experience of trainees.

First impressions are everything and looking at a program that does not immediately please us aesthetically makes us less inclined to enjoy interacting with it.

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E-learning in the Healthcare Industry

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For most professions, keeping up to date with the latest developments and retraining yourself to the newest technologies is a matter of staying relevant.

For medical professionals it is much more than that. It’s a matter of life and death.

Continuous medical training is not only a “nice to have”, but compulsory for those in the healthcare industry. Their knowledge and skills have to not only be maintained, but also regularly expanded and updated.

Even what’s considered a “best practice” in the profession can change drastically in the span of a decade.
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Web vs Apps: The Battle Rages On

Cloud-computing-conceptIn 2005 things seemed clear. The Web was the undisputed king, and with the advent of AJAX and modern CSS, future software was going to be written for the browser.

A year earlier, Joel Spolsky, who had helped create Visual Basic and was a project manager for Excel, had written an article saying that Microsoft had lost the API war, and that the Web makes the operating system irrelevant.

Then, of course, the iPhone happened.
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Insight Into Your Classes: Reporting in eFrontPro

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Evaluating the success of your students and courses is something between a science and an art.

The art part is the kind of inexact heuristic that comes from experience, and you’ll get it after you deal with your first batches of learners.

The science part is, of course, all about measuring. And for that eFrontPro has you covered.
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Is e-Learning Your Best Choice?

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This blog is not just for people working in e-learning or running an e-learning solution at their enterprise. It’s also for those who haven’t yet made the jump and are wondering if this e-learning thing is really for them.

It’s a perfectly valid question, and it’s also exactly what we’re going to examine in today’s post. So, if you’re one of those people, read on.

Spoiler alert: the answer is most likely yes. But, of course, the answer alone is not enough.

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