The best elearning reads of 2013

Every month we put together a list of our favorite articles for our monthly newsletter (based on Jane Hart’s comprehensive monthly lists) – we’ve put those together and taken note of the most popular articles on social media (the ones with the most RTs, shares and likes) to create this list of best reads in elearning and learning for the year!

  1. YouTube another MOOP (Massive Open Online Pedagogy) Learning will not be televised, it will be digitised, Donald Clark
  2. It’s the end of an era – enter the knowledgeable networker, John Kotter, Forbes
  3. Ensuring knowledge flow through narration, Harold Jarche
  4. The Teacher’s Quick Guide To Digital Scavenger Hunts, Edudemic
  5. The End of the Web, Search, and Computer as We Know It, Wired
  6. Are you in the training ghetto, Donald Taylor
  7. Cognitive Dissonance and the Denial of Social/Informal Learning, Mike Britz
  8. Social media at work. Really? John Stepper
  9. Delivering a PowerPoint? Your Audience Will Tune Out After 10 Minutes, Forbes
  10. Learning technology: are we using it right? Julian Stodd
  11. The Connected Learners- A Book by Students for Teachers, Langwitches Blog
  12. Mapping with Google
  13. 3 ways to becoming a master learner, Erika Anderson
  14. Conferences Need To Focus More On Learning Design And Less On Information Transfer, Jeff Hurt
  15. Research in the digital age, it’s more than finding information, Scientific American
  16. Learning is too important to be left to professionals, Harold Jarche
  17. 5 Practical ideas for Embedding learning into the workflow, Towards Maturity
  18. Social First!, Clark Quinn
  19. Good, bad and ugly: 7 critics of social media, Donald Clark
  20. 19 Antiquated Employee Engagement Approaches Contributing to Organizational Anxiety, David Zinger
  21. Why every email should be 5 sentences long, Fast Company
  22. Do we still need the telephone? Lucy Kellaway
  23. The 4 things people can still do better than computers, Fast Company
  24. The Dysfunctionally Connected Workplace Problem-And How To Fix It, Ken Blanchard and Scott Blanchard, FastCompany
  25. The Emerging Collaborative & Sharing Mentalities of the Millenial Generation, P2P Foundation’s Blog
  26. How Technology Changes The Skills We Need To Learn, Forbes
  27. Being explicit about corporate learning, Clark Quinn
  28. Enterprise technology through the years (graphic), Forbes
  29. You can’t enforce curiosity, Euan Semple
  30. Why Learning is Complicated, Dennis Callahan
  31. Digital Natives Looking to Unplug, Connect, Scientific American
  32. Make your employees more productive, HBR BLog Network
  33. Six Classes Your Employer Wishes You Could Take, HBR Blog Network
  34. Dear C-Suite, we don’t do training, Dan Pontefract, CLO Magazine
  35. The tragedy of L&D, Nick Shackleton-Jones
  36. Conversation and collaboration: the next generation of working practices, Wired
  37. An “All You Can Eat” College Degree Could Be The Future Of Higher Education, Fast Co-Exist
  38. The Top 10 Workplace Trends Of 2013, Dan Schawbel, Forbes
  39. Technology and change, Euan Semple
  40. The science of storytelling: how narrative cuts through distraction like nothing else, Fast Co-Create
  41. The age of social products, HBR
  42. Gartner: Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends For 2014, Forbes
  43. How to Build Effective Online Learning Communities, Edudemic
  44. eLearning: From the enclosure to the global learning commons, David Price, elearn Magazine
  45. L&D: Get into the Enterprise Social Conversation, the work social
  46. MOOCs will ultimately play a transformational role, Stephen Downes
  47. Does technology improve employee engagement? Dion Hinchcliffe, ZDNet
  48. Introducing Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) to a Corporate Audience, Eric Kammerer, Learning Solutions Magazine
  49. Big Data – bums on seats measures wrong end of learner, Donald Clark
  50. The simplest way to know what everyone’s doing at work, FastCompany

  • Kate

    I recommend Marina Arshavskiy’s book on Instructional Design for ELearning.