Twitter in the classroom

It’s inevitable that any medium designed for ease of communication and networking will be applied to a learning context however many educators are still trying to come to grips with Twitter, and in particular its use in the classroom.

For a comprehensive list of resources on Twitter in the classroom and workplace, check out Dr. Tony Karrer’s list here – and also Edudemic’s 100 Ways to use Twitter in Education.

There are a multitude of ways Twitter can be integrated into classroom teaching, for example:

  1. Gather real world data – this makes learning based on up-to-date information with real people (with a real story behind it!).
  2. Monitor/ GeoTag the ‘buzzwords’
  3. Summarize topics/ view as tweets
  4. Tweetstory
  5. Collate classroom views
  6. Let parents follow what you’re up to
  7. Find out where people are – giving the class an immediate set of places and distances to research.
  8. Story telling in 140 characters as group or individual
  9. Twitter poll
  10. Word morph – using your network to search for synonyms and other meanings
  11. Finding ‘classmates’ in other locations to share information, resources and ideas
  12. Point of view and character development using Twitter (or “Twalter egos”)
  13. GeoTweets
  14. Global assembly
  15. Word play
  16. Communicate with experts
  17. Monitor the learning process
  18. Probability – when learning about probability and the language of chance in mathematics, use your Twitter network to offer a real world response to your questions

(For more ideas check out this presentation online)

We also found it interesting how this one college is using Twitter in the classroom:

We’d love to hear from you if you have any suggestions for using Twitter in the classroom! If you’d like for us to add your suggestion to the list in the post, please put them in comments below!

About the author

Roberta Gogos is a Social Media & Content Marketing Consultant and eFront Learning’s Community Manager, she is contributing author to a number of blogs and focuses on social media, culture-specific communication, technology, and elearning. She can be contacted @rgogos or via LinkedIn.

 

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