Cost & time saving benefits of using eLearning: The Mobile Money story

Mobile Money was founded in 1998 and was the UK’s first cash log book loans company, providing cash loans at a national level. Unlike most loan companies, they operate a branch network of friendly staff and they currently have 33 branches throughout England and Wales. The training of their staff is essential to providing a high quality service to their customers, and with over 70 staff spread all over the UK, arranging face-to-face training can be both difficult and costly so they decided to investigate eLearning Systems and how they could be used to deliver critical training to staff across a wide range of locations.

Mobile Money found the eFront eLearning solution was the best solution to design not only impressive eLearning Courses, but also assessments and tests and to keep a record of all training undertaken by staff. eFront also allowed Mobile Money to design an unlimited number of courses and tests for one price rather than paying per test.

A key requirement was that the LMS allowed them to set up courses with several different question types – making sure the assessments are as interesting and interactive as possible and to ensure that the course learning objectives have been achieved. Creating random tests from a Pool of questions and using Skills Gaps Tests to identify any missing employee skills are some of the features that Mobile Money were keen to start using.

“We are excited to introduce eFront into the company and are looking forward to receiving the cost and time saving benefits of using e-Learning as an alternative to face to face training.”
~ Mr Simon Furnival, Operations Director, Mobile Money Limited

For more, please download the case study:

What is social learning?

‘Social learning’ has been the elearning buzzword du jour for a couple of years now and people often ask us exactly what social learning is. I think Marcia Conner captures it perfectly in her definition as follows:

Social learning is learning that takes place through social interaction between peers and it may or may not lead to a change in attitudes and/or behavior. More specifically, to be considered social learning, a process must: (1) demonstrate that a change in understanding has taken place in the individuals involved; (2) demonstrate that this change goes beyond the individual and becomes situated within wider social units or communities of practice; and (3) occur through social interactions and processes between actors within a social network (Reed et al., 2010). Continue reading